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Sony NP-FW50 Lithium-Ion Rechargeable Battery

Fits: Sony Alpha NEX-3, 5, 6 and 7 Series Cameras, DSLR-SLT-A33, DSLR-SLT-A55

R1,999.99

Sony NP-FW50

The Sony NP-FW50 Lithium-Ion Rechargeable Battery is unique in its design since it not only supplies power to your camera but will display the remaining battery capacity. Small and lightweight, lithium-ion batteries can be charged or discharged at any time without developing memory effects.

The Sony NP-FW50 Fits: Sony Alpha NEX-3, 5, 6 and 7 Series Cameras, DSLR-SLT-A33, DSLR-SLT-A55

 

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Lithium Ion Batteries

A lithium-ion battery or Li-ion battery (abbreviated as LIB) is a type of rechargeable battery. Lithium-ion batteries are commonly used for portable electronics and electric vehicles and are growing in popularity for military and aerospace applications.[9] A prototype Li-ion battery was developed by Akira Yoshino in 1985, based on earlier research by John Goodenough, Stanley Whittingham, Rachid Yazami and Koichi Mizushima during the 1970s–1980s,[10][11][12] and then a commercial Li-ion battery was developed by a Sony and Asahi Kasei team led by Yoshio Nishi in 1991.[13]

In the batteries, lithium ions move from the negative electrode through an electrolyte to the positive electrode during discharge, and back when charging. Li-ion batteries use an intercalated lithium compound as the material at the positive electrode and typically graphite at the negative electrode. The batteries have a high energy density, no memory effect (other than LFP cells)[14] and low self-discharge. They can however be a safety hazard since they contain a flammable electrolyte, and if damaged or incorrectly charged can lead to explosions and fires. Samsung was forced to recall Galaxy Note 7 handsets following lithium-ion fires,[15] and there have been several incidents involving batteries on Boeing 787s.

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