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Sony VG-C3EM Vertical Grip (Sony a9 & a7R III)

 

For Alpha a9 & a7R III Cameras

Holds Two NP-FZ100 Batteries

Extended Grip for Vertical Shooting

Second Shutter Button and Multi Selector

 

R8,199.00

Sony VG-C3EM 

Dedicated to the Sony Alpha a9 and a7R III mirrorless cameras, the Sony VG-C3EM Vertical Grip offers both extended battery and a more comfortable grip when shooting in the vertical orientation. The grip accepts two NP-FZ100 batteries to effectively double the battery life for long shooting sessions, and the batteries can be charged in the grip while attached to the camera via the body’s USB port. The grip’s design maintains the same layout as the camera body itself, and includes a secondary shutter button and Multi Selector for intuitive use. Also, the grip is built from magnesium alloy and is dust- and moisture-resistant to match the weather sealing of the camera itself.

 

A lithium-ion battery or Li-ion battery (abbreviated as LIB) is a type of rechargeable battery. Lithium-ion batteries are commonly used for portable electronics and electric vehicles and are growing in popularity for military and aerospace applications.[9] A prototype Li-ion battery was developed by Akira Yoshino in 1985, based on earlier research by John Goodenough, Stanley Whittingham, Rachid Yazami and Koichi Mizushima during the 1970s–1980s,[10][11][12] and then a commercial Li-ion battery was developed by a Sony and Asahi Kasei team led by Yoshio Nishi in 1991.[13]

In the batteries, lithium ions move from the negative electrode through an electrolyte to the positive electrode during discharge, and back when charging. Li-ion batteries use an intercalated lithium compound as the material at the positive electrode and typically graphite at the negative electrode. The batteries have a high energy density, no memory effect (other than LFP cells)[14] and low self-discharge. They can however be a safety hazard since they contain a flammable electrolyte, and if damaged or incorrectly charged can lead to explosions and fires. Samsung was forced to recall Galaxy Note 7 handsets following lithium-ion fires,[15] and there have been several incidents involving batteries on Boeing 787s.

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