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Online shopping and shipping is available. Please confirm stock availability and prices before placing your order. Stay Safe & Stay Informed. www.sacoronavirus.co.za

Online shopping and shipping is available. Please confirm stock availability and prices before placing your order.

Stay Safe & Stay Informed. SA COVID-19 updates: www.sacoronavirus.co.za

Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4: A Full-Frame Lens with a ‘Medium Format Look’

Cameraland Sandton

Zeiss has just officially announced the new Otus 100mm f/1.4 lens for the Canon EF and Nikon F mounts. It’s the fourth Otus lens to be announced and the one with the longest focal length so far.

With the addition of the manual-focus 100mm f/1.4, the Otus lens family (which touts “uncompromising performance”) now consists of the 28mm f/1.4, 55mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.4, and 100mm f/1.4.

“The ZEISS Otus 1.4/100 is one of the best lenses in its class due to its low sample variation, outstanding imaging performance, and superior build quality,” Zeiss says. “Although developed for 35mm full-frame cameras, the Otus 1.4/100 gives you the quality and look of a medium-format system.”

The lens features an apochromatic design that “prevents almost all conceivable aberrations.”

“Because this lens is an apochromat, chromatic aberrations (axial chromatic aberrations) are corrected with elements of special glass with anomalous partial dispersion,” Zeiss says. “The chromatic aberrations are therefore significantly below the defined limits. Bright-dark transitions in the image, and especially highlights, are reproduced almost completely free of color artifacts.”

Other features and specs of the lens include 14 elements in 11 groups, a minimum focusing distance of 3.28 feet (1m), a high-quality coating that minimizes lens flare, and “practically no color fringing.”

 

Here are some sample photos captured with the lens:

Photo by Björn Pados

Photo by Peter Coulson

Photo by Peter Coulson

Photo by Dany Eid

Blog Credit: petapixel.com (Michael Zhang)